Bias Binding, Gemma Tank, Liberty Fabric, Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Linen and Liberty Josephine Blouse

I had already started making a version of the Josephine Blouse by Made By Rae in this Loominous fabric when I saw a version of the Roscoe blouse on instagram with contrasting neck and sleeve binding and that was it. I had a vision of a boho blouse in linen with a Liberty floral trim. I had already purchased this lightweight Telio linen checked fabric and I realized that this Liberty lawn would be perfect. Both fabrics from fabric.com. (I plan to also make the Roscoe at a later date but will be making it in rayon.)The Josephine is usually made with pleats but Rae posted a version with gathers that is the perfect Boho Blouse. It is loose and cute but shaped with bust darts. Many of the other styles such as the Roscoe have raglan sleeves and need a really flow-ey fabric such as rayon but the Josephine’s slimmer profile works well in cotton and in linen. It is less full cut and the gathers are more controlled.¬†Rae suggests using elastic thread but I find that I have more control with my two rows of gather stitches. The linen is so crinkly that the gathers don’t have to be perfect and it still looks good.The actually cutting and sewing of the pattern is very straightforward. The front is sewn together and the back is one piece cut on the fold. You gather the fabric in the center back and the center of the two front pieces. You cut the two mirror halves of the front, one back piece and two sleeves. I then made the bias binding and two rectangles to make cuffs. I usually stitch just on the edge of the cuff, not in the ditch. I like the look of the visible stitching.I have to say I was thrilled with how this turned out. I used bias strips of Liberty as hem facings, as one does.Finished blouse below. It is finally warm enough for front door pictures.My sewing room has one window that faces west. Such beautiful light.I had enough of these two fabrics to also make a version of the Gemma tank cropped with a gathered linen skirt. This dress is going to be perfect for spring. More late afternoon light. I can’t get enough of it after a long, dark winter.

And many pictures of the blouse as worn. This is going to be in frequent rotation. I love the neckline. Rae is a genius with necklines.img_9738I used the curved hem from the Gemma tank as my guide for this hem. I love how you can mix and match Rae’s patterns.¬†Back view.The other side view.I look as though I am summoning the backyard spirits but I think my husband caught me on the way to fix my hair and put it behind my ears.As you can see in the next picture. He takes a zillion pictures and then I whittle them down to a few. What can I say? Perfect combination of pattern and fabrics. The Loominous version is going to be great too. Almost finished! Spring sewing is officially underway.

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Made By Rae Patterns, Quilting, Reading and Books, Sewing

April 2018 Reading and Sewing

The weather in the Northeast has been a bit strange this spring with at least one day of snow most weeks since February. This has been good for my reading life, not so good for my sewing life, since all I want to do is lie on the couch and read. But there are consolations. For one, I read this book which had been on my shelf for years and which was fantastic. What a writer. The kind of book that leaves you afraid to pick up the next one because it will break the spell. I loved the protagonist, the setting, the weirdness of it all. If you haven’t read it, you are in for a treat.I heard about the next book from From¬†the Front Porch. I had never read anything by this author but based on the five star reviews of several people I trust, I picked it up at the library. I loved the first section and expected to love it all. I am not sure if it was the fact that there was so much hype but although I liked the book and was glad I read it, I didn’t ultimately love love love it. I am not sure if it was because it felt to me as if several of the characters made poor decisions or effectively sold out-I think that is a large point of the book-but I didn’t connect with it as many others appear to have. But I would still give it four stars-worth reading, if for no other reason because everyone else is and you will be able to be part of the conversation. On another note, my book group just picked this book for May and based on things I am hearing,¬† I really don’t want to read it. If you have read and have opinions, please comment!The next book is a non-fiction account of a series of murders of members of the Osage tribe in the early 1900’s in Oklahoma and how that related to the beginning days of the FBI. It was well researched and I am so glad I read it because it is a chapter in history that I knew nothing about. Side note, I was an America History major in college and it still shocks me how little I seem to know about history. Trying to remedy that but it is a project. ūüôāThe Heart’s Invisible Furies was recommended to me by Catherine who is one of the four people whose taste in books most closely resembles mine and who I rely on for book recommendations. The other three are Anne Bogel, Annie Jones who owns this wonderful bookstore and Lindsey Mead. I highly recommend all four as wonderful resources. This is the story of an Irish woman and her son and the country of Ireland with its geography, culture, religious influences, history. Really Ireland is as much a character as any of the characters. I loved the writing and became very invested in the outcomes of the characters and learned so much. Again, feeling as though there is so much I don’t know-my grandfather’s family is Irish but what I don’t know about Ireland is a lot. This book gave me an entirely new perspective. Highly recommend.¬†I listened to Sourdough at the suggestion of my daughter who is a passionate home chef and loves to try new recipes. When she read this, she was inspired to bake all the bread and I can see why. The book was very entertaining and I appreciated the humorous take on some of the current non-food, food trends.¬†I listened to the next book on audio. Joshilyn Jackson is an actress and she narrates most of her own books. I enjoyed it and will continue to work through her backlist. They make great car listening because they are entertaining enough that you stay engaged in the story, but don’t require a huge amount of focus.I read this sweet little book because I had gotten it on a daily kindle deal which is how I get many of the books I have been meaning to read. I really appreciate that Modern Mrs. Darcy curates this list. It was entertaining and light after some of my other reads. This is the book I am currently reading and I am so engaged in the story of the central character Jojo. I am about 100 pages in and loving it although the themes are hard. I read Salvage the Bones earlier this year and I highly recommend both. She is really an amazing writer. I picked up her memoir at our local independent book store and have added it to the stack of books I am taking on vacation in June.Next up will be this book which was my April Shelf Subscription book. I love books where place and setting and atmosphere are a big part of the story so I am really looking forward to reading it.

And now on to sewing. With spring peeking in every couple of days, I am excited to sew all the things, especially with Me Made May right around the corner. I have several projects in the almost done phase and hope to blog about them soon.

First, I have been sewing several different Boho blouses, a current fashion trend. I sewed a Valley Blouse in navy double gauze that I purchased from Imagine Gnats (they have a great selection and their prices are really reasonable.) This is the neckline which is quite low. The verdict is out on this but after setting it aside and coming back to it, I am liking it more. Does that happen to you too? I hope to finish it this week. Stay tuned.

After feeling a bit discouraged with the somewhat voluminous shape of the Valley blouse, I decided to try the Josephine Blouse by Made by Rae, a pattern which I bought several years ago and have never made. I was inspired by this version that Rae made. I decided to try it in a different Loominous fabric and I am loving where this is heading. Hope to finish it this week but it is looking promising. The profile is slimmer and more shaped which I prefer and the neckline is not as low.

After having some success with the Josephine, I happened to see a version of the Roscoe blouse on instagram where the sewist had used a contrasting fabric for bias binding the neck and for the sleeve cuffs and I thought aha! I had already bought some linen to use for summer dresses but once this idea got into my head, I just had to try it. This is going to be a checked linen Josephine blouse with bias binding made of Liberty fabric. I am really happy where this is going.Also inspired by Rae and in the same vein as this Beatrix dress, I am making several versions of the Gemma Tank with peplum ruffles or with a skirt. Here are those same fabrics. I love how floaty the linen feels. I didn’t quite have enough for both the blouse and the dress so I added a panel to the front of the skirt. It still needs hemming but I think it will be great for summer.Here are some shorter versions in process in quilting cotton and rayon. You can find Rae’s tutorial for this version of the pattern here.

I continue to hand quilt this antique top I bought probably 20 years ago. It is my go-to when I need something quiet and meditative to do. I am always inspired by the creativity of those women who came before us who pieced little scraps into these works of art and love.¬†Other plans for the spring are the Tamarack Jacket. I have this olive twill for the jacket and just a yard of this quilting cotton so plan to see if I can use the quilting cotton for the lining of the front and back and line the sleeves with a solid pink double gauze.¬†And finally, I joined the rest of the sewing and knitting community in buying this book and plan to make at least two versions of the Uniform Tank. This is watercolor linen from Purl Soho for a long-sleeved version and a floral cotton sateen by Nani Iro (also from Imagine Gnats) for a sleeveless version. And then I will need to learn to knit!I have been doing some more writing and set up this little desk on our third floor. This was taken yesterday in the early morning sunshine. I am typing here now and it cold and windy. And there you have it, our spring in a nutshell. I can’t wait for May and warmer weather!I am linking up today with the Modern Mrs. Darcy blog quick lit post which you can find here.

 

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Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Heritage Rayon Challis Beatrix Dress

When I first saw this beautiful April Rhodes fabric last summer, I knew that I wanted to make something with it. Red is not normally a color I gravitate to. Most of my handmade garments are blue or yellow but I loved the fabric so I bought a couple of yards. I thought it would be perfect for a holiday garment (tree close-up with ornament made 25 years ago when my daughter was in preschool, sob.)

Then life got busy, as it usually does. I teach nursing students for 12 weeks in the fall in addition to my regular Monday-Friday job and there isn’t time for much sewing. That gave me a lot of time to think about what to make. This summer I made this dress.

I liked the general shape of the dress but the shoulders and neckline didn’t fit me well: too loose in the neck and too tight in the shoulders.¬†I decided to try using the Beatrix Blouse pattern by Made by Rae as the starting point to make a loose dress that was similar.¬† I had made the Beatrix several times and knew that the shoulders and bodice fit perfectly. I thought if I cropped it and added a gently gathered skirt that I would end up with a dress I would really enjoy dressing wearing.

I first made the¬† Beatrix when the pattern was released. It was one of the first patterns I sewed after the Washi Dress and I learned a lot in the process because Rae did a series of blog posts that walk you through making the pattern from start to finish. I learned so much going through that process. She literally explained how to tape the pattern, how to take your own measurements and how to make adjustments for your body type. I learned so many great sewing techniques. When I first made the blouse, the medium fit pretty well with a couple of inches added to the length (I am 5’9″ with a very long torso) but there was a bit of gaping at the neckline. Rae told me how to do a hollow chest adjustment and once I did that, the fit was perfect. It is a really subtle adjustment but it makes all the difference. I just fold a tiny bit of the pattern at the center front and then shift it back once I cut the neckline.

When I cut the bodice out for this project, I put one of my Beatrix blouses on and then figured out where I wanted the bodice to end and the skirt to start which was just under the rib cage. I marked the spot with a pin and then drew a line on the pattern pieces to match that bodice length after adding 1/2 cm for a seam allowance. I folded the pattern piece on that line and cut out the shortened front and back bodice in both the rayon and in the cotton batiste that I planned to use for the bodice lining. I cut out the pieces before Thanksgiving and then they sat on my ironing board until January. But that’s ok. Sometimes you have time and energy to sew and sometimes you don’t. I did a lot more reading than sewing this fall. Reading on Christmas Day below. Such a good book. The ear muffs were my given to one of my daughters. I was just borrowing them. They are actually really warm and cozy though a bit flashier than my usual style.

After the holidays I went back to work and did a long drive the weekend after New Year’s Day,¬† taking my daughter back to school. Finally, the second weekend in January, I had time and energy and finished the dress. img_8464Pictures of sewing the bodice below.

I realized that I cut the back lining piece too wide so I just sewed a center seam to take out the excess. I like to top stitch around the neckline so that everything lies flat.

I sewed the shoulder seams together for both the bodice and lining, sewed the pieces together at the neckline, gathered the sleeves and attached them and then used Rae’s burrito or sausage method to line the bodice. Then I sewed the side seams of the sleeves and the bodice side seams.

I used the skirt from the Isla pattern as a template to cut out the front and back skirt pieces.

I added 2 inches to the width of the back skirt piece because I am bigger in the back than the front and I thought the dress would flow more nicely with a bit more gathered fabric in the back. I did this when I made my  Isla Maxi Dress I was really happy with it. I marked the back skirt piece with two pins and front piece with one pin because they were so close in size that I was afraid that I would mix them up. Then I gathered the front and backs, sewed the two skirt pieces together using french seams, lined up the center front of the bodice with the center of the front skirt and did the same on the back and sewed the bodice to the skirt. I turned the bottom edge of the lining under and hand sewed the lining to the seam that joins the bodice to the skirt in the same manner that Rae shows in her Washi tutorials.

I usually make a hem facing but I thought it might make the hem more stiff since the rayon was so lightweight so I just turned up the hem twice and sewed a line of stitches using a matching thread. It came out fine. I have yet to hand hem a garment. I am sure there will be a time when I feel I should but I have gotten this far machine hemming with good success. And that was it. It was a pretty quick sew. I like that the dress has shape from the darts but is also loose and flowey. I think it can be dressed up and down. I have already worn it to church and I have plans to make it again. I have this rayon which I think would be perfect! This isn’t the first time I lengthened the Beatrix. I have also made two tunic length Beatrix’s that I love. One seen below last summer on the beach. You can read details about those here and here. I highly recommend the Beatrix pattern and Rae’s Beatrix sewalong posts and her videos demonstrating the bodice-lining technique.

More pictures of my new red dress below. You can tell it was windy.

I had the perfect sweater in my closet. Never get rid of a cardigan, that’s my motto. I want to sew the Blackwood Cardigan¬†by Helen’s Closet this year. I think it will be perfect in a sweater knit over this dress worn with jeans.

Perfect with denim.

I love the fit through the bodice.

I highly recommend this pattern!

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Bias Binding, Sewing

Tucks and Dots: my take on the Stylish Dress Book Dress E

img_6982These dotty little ladies are one of my favorite fabric designs from Cotton and Steel although there are so many wonderful designs that it is hard to choose. I bought several yards of this fabric knowing that I would definitely make a Gemma Tank top from this fabric at some point but the Dress E from the Stylish Dress Book has been on my radar for a long time and this fabric seemed to me to be perfectly suited to the style so yesterday I took the plunge.

Making this dress requires a commitment. First you have to buy the book, then you have to buy Swedish Tracing Paper in order to trace your pattern which is actually not for the faint of heart because multiple pattern pieces overly each other. It is doable but not necessarily easy. The pattern pieces do not include seam allowances, my bust size put me between size 10 and size 12 and most of the posts I had read about this dress said that it ran big. I didn’t know what to do. Of course I could have made a muslin which would be the smart thing to do but I decided to just plunge ahead. As it turns out, hem allowances are also not included in the pattern pieces, you have to add them. Needless to say, I didn’t realize this until after I had cut out my fabric. So although I thought I had been so smart to add 2 inches for my 5’9.5″ height, I actually hadn’t really because there was no hem included on the pattern to begin with. Yikes!

I also struggled a bit with the tucks especially since the front bodice seemed so wide despite taking about an inch out of it when I cut it out. I ended up just starting at one end of the bodice and sewing 1 inch tucks every 2 inches across the bodice which gave me 9 seams instead of the 5 that the pattern calls for. They are not completely centered but you really have to look closely to see. Amazingly, it worked out pretty well. I might even like it better than the original. I didn’t end up using the neck facing because with all my changes, I thought it probably wouldn’t work so I used my favorite bias binding (oxymoron alert) technique. I also used a hem facing, which had been my plan but in light of the extra short hem-less pattern piece, was now a necessity and used facings for the sleeves because I didn’t want them to be too short. I used one of the Cotton and Steel basics fabrics that I used for the bias binding of my Octopi Gemma Tanks. I also added an inch to the length of the back bodice and took about 3 inches out of the width of the back skirt. I could definitely cut out more width front and back. It is full! I think if I made this again, I might sew my tucks down one more inch to match the length of the back bodice since I have such a long torso and to control some of the volume. I actually would probably cut out some of the volume altogether. I cut a 12 with seam allowances for the sleeves and arm scythes and the shoulders were still tight even though the neck gapes a bit. It is my opinion that different pattern makers have different body types that they primarily design for and I am so spoiled making Made by Rae designs that almost always fit with perhaps a minor tiny tweak. So I think that I will try using the Josephine Pattern that I have had forever and never made and reverse the tucks and see if I can make something similar that fits better through the upper chest and shoulders for my swimmer’s shoulders and 5’9″ frame. Pictures of my work in process and finished dress below. Tucks and bias binding of neckline:img_6985Hem facing:img_6989Sleeve Facing:img_7002 and close up of finished sleeves: img_7001Finished Dress on Place of Honor (front door)-note the fullness:img_7003 Back of Dress (full, very full):img_7008 and as worn. Front: img_7083Side:img_7065and back: img_7043I think this ended up being one stylish dress! img_7089

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Cleo Skirt, Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Made By Rae Cleo Summer Showcase: So Many Skirts

cleo summer showcase (ig)

I am thrilled to be part of the Made By Rae Cleo Summer Showcase and to be able to share the many skirts I have made with the Made By Rae Cleo pattern. The Cleo is like all of the MBR patterns: beautifully drafted to be flattering and comfortable with clear directions that are really well illustrated. Rae’s patterns really are wonderful and are the foundation of my handmade wardrobe.

This is my most recent Cleo skirt. It is made with a beautiful voile by Sharon Holland. I also made an Isla Knit Dress in the blue colorway of the same fabric. The design really spoke to me.Here it is worn with a black double gauze MBR Gemma Tank left untucked and blowing in the breeze:
and with the same Gemma Tank tucked in with clogs: and with a yellow lawn Gemma Tank:and with a black lawn Gemma Tank a different pair of sandals:and with my newly sewn Piper Top:It would also be great with my new black Rumi Tank top which you will see further down the post. ūüėä

My voile Cleo Skirt might just be my favorite but it is hard to choose because I have made so many others. The Cleo is also great in cotton lawn. Here are two versions I made with beautiful fabric from the Juniper collection by Kelly Ventura. Version 1:img_2644-1Version 2: img_2671-1I couldn’t decide which fabric to buy so I bought them both and I love both skirts. This fabric is lightweight and swishy. It was easy to sew with. It drapes beautifully. I am a total fan. img_0252-1They are both perfect with my blue cotton-linen Gemma and my newly sewn white double gauze Gemma and with any  number of colors of cardigans but I especially like this floral version with my orange cardigan. img_4925My yellow lawn Gemma Tank also works well with these skirts. img_6337I used scraps of the yellow for a facing for the hems for all three of my voile and lawn Cleos. The hem facing gives me a visual guide for where to fold the fabric and gives me more accurate results. I also just love the look of the contrasting hem.img_0214The Cleo is also great in lightweight woven fabrics. I made this version with a woven cotton-linen blend from Joanne Fabric. I also made a matching Gemma Tank which I love although I like them better worn separately.I used a white lightweight cotton batiste for the hem facing and bias binding.This skirt is perfect with my double gauze Gemma or with the yellow lawn Gemma. I ended up making this skirt about one inch shorter than the others because I ended up trimming some fabric from the skirt to line up the stripes.The Gemma top is perfect with just about anything but here it is with white jeans. Here they are together. Maybe a little too many stripes although I wore them with the top untucked once and liked them that way.I was inspired by Rae’s beautiful version to sew a Cleo in this great fabric from Anna Maria Horner’s Loominous II fabric line. It is so nice to wear. Really soft and lightweight. img_5226 I have really enjoyed wearing it this summer. It is perfect for hot summer days. This is a bit rumpled right out of the dryer and I don’t even care.img_5453-2I also sewed several versions of the Cleo in quilting cotton. I saw a beautiful Ruby dress on Instagram made with lime green fabric  by Heather Bailey and it inspired me to sew this Cleo. This fabric was a pleasure to sew with.  It is a bit poofier than the voile but I love the 50’s feel of this skirt.It is great with my new black knit Piper top.  One of the first Cleos I sewed was this one in April Rhodes’ Fringe fabric inspired by child and adult versions she made and posted on her Instagram. It is a nice lightweight quilting cotton that makes a great skirt. I love it with my blue, white and black Gemmas and it is perfect with boots and tights in winter.
I really love this fabric. It also makes a great pair of Luna Pants.I recently made the Rumi knit tank top by Christine Haynes and I love it with this skirt and flip flops for  summer. Front view: Back view: I enjoy experimenting with designs and patterns and I had this fabric in my stash. It is from the Arizona collection also from April Rhodes. I had fun sewing this skirt and seeing how this pattern looks with the gathers. This fabric is now available in a new colorway which would also be great.Again with the white double gauze Gemma. Such a perfect piece for mixing and matching.And here is my original tester Cleo. It fit really well without any real adjustments. I was so honored to be included as a tester for this pattern. It is absolutely amazing to me to have started sewing for myself two years ago and to now have an entirely Me Made wardrobe and to have had the opportunity to test a pattern for Made By Rae. Amazing!

I am 5’9 1/2″ tall and average build but most of my height is in my torso so I generally don’t need to add length to skirts. My measurements put me right between a Medium and a Large and I cut between those lines to make my tester version but as the skirt is pretty full, I have made the rest of them in a straight Medium and I am very happy with the fit.

When I made the test version, I loved the length as it was unhemmed and thought it was perfect for me. Rae ended up lengthening View B in the final version of the pattern but I keep sewing mine using my unhemmed tester pattern length. I started sewing hem facings because I didn’t want to have to figure out how much to add to end up with the same perfect length. So my skirts are all based on the skirt pattern piece unhemmed length of 23 inches less about 3/8 inch for the seam allowance for my hem facing.

I ended up giving my tester version to my beautiful daughter who had the perfect shoes to match. Here she is during a recent visit to Connecticut.And here she is in a Cleo action shot back in the Midwest. I have a navy cotton lawn version in the works for her in this great Ninepin lawn from Cotton and Steel. I may make version A which is a bit shorter and has great pockets,The Cleo would also be amazing in this double gauze and this rayon.  I think a longer rayon Cleo with boots would be perfect for fall. And the double gauze version Rae made is so beautiful it is tempting to make one just like it. You can see how one can easily be inspired to make So Many Skirts!

I have really loved sewing this pattern and highly recommend it.

Links to my other Cleo posts below and to all of the wonderful participants in the Cleo Showcase. Be sure to check them out and be inspired.

Nursebean Cleo Posts:

I have sewn many versions of most of the MBR patterns. You can link to some of them here:

Cleo Showcase Instagram and Blog Links:

july 31

vicky / @sewvee / sewvee.blogspot.co.uk

erin / @hungiegungie / hungiegungie.com

natalie / @sewhungryhippie / hungryhippie sews

teri / @teridodds1 / fa sew la

august 1

tori / @thedoingthingsblog / thedoingthingsblog.com

lindsay / @lindsayinstitches

meredith / @thefooshe / oliviajanehandcrafted.com/blog

kate / @kate.english

august 2

melissa / @ahappystitch / ahappystitch.com

julie / @nursebean82 / nursebeansews.wordpress.com

lauren / @laurenddesign / laurendurrdesign.com

august 3

fleurine / @mariefleurine / sewmariefleur.com

bettina / @stahlarbeit / stahlarbeit.ch

allie / @indie_sew / indiesew.com/blog

darci / @darcialexis / darcisews.com

emily / @mycraftylittleself / mycraftylittleself.blogspot.com

august 4

whitney / @whitneydeal / whitney-deal.com/blog

sienna  /@notaprimarycolor

amy nicole / @amynicolestudio / amynicolestudio.com

kim / @pitykitty

kten / @jinxandgunner / jinxandgunner.blogspot.com

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Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Summer Islas

img_5563A little more than two years ago, I started sewing my own clothes and last fall, I took the plunge into knits. I lived all winter long in my Isla Capsule Wardrobe and this summer, I decided to sew some more versions in some floral fabrics in a slightly longer length in light of bare legs vs leggings. I had picked out a beautiful purple floral by Pat Bravo,¬†the beautiful green floral from¬†Rae Hoekstra’s Sidewalk Fabric line and the blue-green colorway of Amy Butler’s Glow knit which I scooped up when it was on sale, having been really happy with the fabric when I sewed the¬†grey colorway as one of my first¬†Isla tops. img_4549-1And as worn here: img_4585This would seem to be plenty: 3 summer dresses. And then, April Rhodes’ amazing new fabric line was released and I was inspired to make one more.¬†I alternate my sewing methods. Sometimes I sew my clothes in batches of the same pattern in different versions. This was one of those times, especially since I switch not only the needle and thread type when sewing knits but also the sewing machine foot (I always use a walking foot).img_5555 Other than adding an inch to the length of the skirt (which I neglected to do for the Glow version, I am not sure why) I followed exactly the same methods I used for my first batch of Isla’s which was to use all the tricks that my Instagram friends shared with me and which can be found in this post, This is the first time I have sewn contrasting neck and arm binding and I am really happy with this combination. img_5558And as worn: img_5614Next up I made the Sidewalk fabric version. I knew it would be good because I had seen Rae’s version which inspired me. img_5884This fabric is really nice to work with and I am so happy with how this version turned out.img_5906And as worn:img_6318Next I sewed the¬†Indie Boheme version. This fabric feels very summery to me. I almost bought it in voile to make Rae’s Josephine blouse with gathers. That pattern¬†has been on my To-Be-Sewn list for quite some time and I love¬†her new Loominous II¬†version.¬†img_5675And as worn:img_5873The Amy Butler version is a bit shorter which came in handy when we recently had a heatwave. I didn’t think I cut it differently but I must have.img_5908 This fabric is a bit heavier than the others. It is really easy to sew with and would be great for someone new to knits.img_6369And that would have been it, except that Erin made two beautiful maxi versions¬†of the Isla¬†and I saw another version of a knit maxi dress on Instagram that was not the Isla but which used a blue and white shibori-inspired print. That is when it clicked for me and I decided to take the plunge. I found this bamboo-rayon knit and ordered it on a Monday. It arrived on a Friday. I¬† literally got home from work, washed the fabric, cut the fabric, sewed the fabric. I added about 20 inches to the length of the skirt. I added about 6 inches to the width of the back skirt and none to the front. The fabric was a bit slippery and a bit tricky to cut. I was in a bit of a panic for a minute because I had some trouble lining it up correctly to cut the skirt pieces out after having cut out the bodice but it all worked out in the end. I wore it to a family wedding that next day and I plan to wear it until I wear it out.img_6391 It is amazingly comfortable, flattering and doesn’t wrinkle.img_6386Perfect for a trip to someplace amazing. Now all I need are airplane tickets. Mr. NB, take note! And it is even better with my mustard cardigan, as most of my dresses are.img_6403One of my favorite winter Islas did get some wear time this summer on one of our cooler days. Here it is with leggings and sneakers. I can’t recommend this pattern more highly!img_5938

 

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Cleo Skirt, Gemma Tank, Made By Rae Patterns, Pearl Shift, Sewing

Summer Sewing: June 2017

The view out of the window of my sewing room in the late afternoon. I am so lucky to have this little room of my own. Gemma Tank being finished below.June was a very busy month work-wise and I didn’t have as much time as I would like to sew but I had some projects that were almost done after Me Made May and so I used the time I could find to finish some Gemma Tanks and a Cleo Skirt. I am looking forward to mixing and matching these all summer.

I made a yellow lawn tank out of Robert Kaufman Cambridge Lawn in Maize. I made the scoop necked version in a Medium and lengthened it an inch or so. I applied the bias binding using the traditional method in which you see the binding because I didn’t want the shoulders to be too narrow.I originally planned to wear it with two Cleo skirts that I made in May with beautiful navy lawn fabric. but have found that it goes just as well or better with my striped cotton-linen blend skirt.I ended up having extra of the striped fabric and made another Gemma Tank. I love it. This fabric from Joanne’s was a great purchase. I know this will get a lot of wear year-round. It is perfect with white capris and jeans. 

I finished a Gemma Tank in April Rhodes fabric that I started last summer. I have already worn it several times. It is perfect with jeans and a mustard cardigan. Such a great print.I also finished another Gemma-Pearl Tunic. I absolutely love this shape. I will definitely be making more of these. This is in a beautiful tea-stained print by Cotton and Steel. I used scraps from a much loved Washi dress for the bias binding. I love how easy the Cotton and Steel fabric is to work with. You don’t even need pins. Seriously. Even bias binding is a pleasure with this fabric. I rest my case. This fabric makes me feel as though I can do no wrong. Not something I can say about all fabrics!
For a tutorial on how to make this tunic, check out this post. I finished a Cleo Skirt in a beautiful voile designed by Sharon Holland called Mudcloth. I can’t wait to wear this. I am finishing a black lawn Gemma Tank which I think will be perfect but the yellow works too. I am really happy with how versatile these tops and skirts are. I was wearing the first Cleo skirt that I made while I hand-sewed the front waistband.I love this Loominous Fabric by Anna Maria Horner. This has turned out to be a great hot weather outfit. The tank is one of the many Gemmas that I made last year.The blue and white striped tank and skirt are also great together. I didn’t plan them that way but when I had my pile of various projects on my ironing board I saw them together and realized that that would be another great outfit. I think I have reached the point where I have enough hand-sewn clothes to last for years to come. But fabric designers keep designing beautiful fabric so I will be continuing to sew. Next up is an Isla Dress using these beautiful new knits from April Rhodes. Who could resist?

 

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