Helen's Closet Patterns, Liberty Fabric, Sewing

Seersucker York Pinafore

This has been the summer of the York Pinafore. It has been really hot in the Northeast and when I made my first versions of the York, I realized that it would work well with many hand-sewn tank tops in my wardrobe and be a cool, loose work uniform. I also love that it can be made with 2 yards of fabric and that so many fabrics I already owned worked well for the pattern. So a couple of weeks ago, I cut out three more versions: one practically a duplicate of my much-worn linen-cotton version seen here using scraps left over from this Gemma:

When I originally bought this linen-cotton fabric 3 years ago, I bought a large piece and had many plans for it. I used it to make this Pearl shift which I love but never used the rest of it so had quite a bit in my stash. It turns out it was just waiting all this time to become a York or two. I also cut  one in a lightweight navy linen that I bought this year when I decided that I needed more linen in my life and a third in a cotton seersucker that I bought on sale this spring (and can no longer find where I bought it) which I hoped, but wasn’t sure, would work well in terms of drape. It is so lightweight, that if it did work, I knew it would be great for the 90 degree days we have been having. Turns out it worked great and I love it.

For all of my Yorks, I have lined the pockets. It occurred to me early on that it would be quicker to do that than to turn all the edges under and would simultaneously enclose and finish all of the pocket edges. I am really happy with how this has worked. Here are the pockets of my newest Yorks, all lined up with the top edge topstitched and ready to be sewn onto the front of the pinafores, along with a Ruby blouse bodice that will likely work well with all three. I like the challenge of making pocket linings and bias binding from fabric scraps from prior projects. I am not sure I am really saving a ton of money with the large amount of fabric I purchase but it at least gives me the illusion of thrift and I like the challenge of finding scraps that will work. I have used cotton lawn and voile as linings because I didn’t want to add a lot of bulk to the pockets and change the drape of the garment.

Here are the pocket pieces from my seersucker York ready to be sewn. I cut out the pocket piece from the main fabric and then use that as my template to cut the lining. I generally make the lining a bit larger and then trim once everything is sewn together.

Here are the pocket pieces sewn together and then turned right sides out prior to topstitching.

When I sew the pockets, I cut two of each of the pocket pattern pieces-one from the regular fabric and one of the lining fabric- and sew them together except for the seam that will eventually be sewed into the side seam, I then turn the pockets inside out and press and then sew to the front piece of the pinafore. Then I sew the side seams with wrong sides together and then again with right sides creating a French seam. Lots of trimming of fringe and stray threads happens in between sewing the two seams. I wasn’t sure how French seams would work with the pockets but I am here to say, 6 Yorks later,  that it has worked great. Here is a close-up of the edge of the pocket turned up so you can see the lining. I used a floral cotton lawn by Liberty of London left over from this blouse.

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And here are some pictures of the finished garment.

Front:

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Back:

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Inside view so you can see the trim:

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And as worn.

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I love that little partially hidden pop of floral liberty fabric. I am wearing my Seersucker York with my white double gauze Gemma Tank. I will be making another or these (or two) this winter as it is my go-to top. Goes with everything.

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I used leftover solid cotton lawn when I sewed a York in a cotton-linen canvas print: navy for pocket linings and bias binding and yellow for the hem facing. 

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The canvas was so crisp it was a pleasure to sew with.

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And here are the finished views:

Inside so you can see the bias binding and hem facing:img_2634

Finished front:

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And finished back view:

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And as worn:

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Most of my cotton lawn scraps come from the many Gemma Tanks that I made over the last few years, many of which work with my Yorks, creating endless mix and match outfits. Is it any wonder I keep making York after York? I have some pink linen fabric that I bought earlier this year planning to make a top but now I can’t get a pink York out of my head. Stay tuned!

 

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Bias Binding, Helen's Closet Patterns, Sewing

Ojos Flame Challis York Pinafore

img_3226Ever since I saw this beautiful version of the Helen’s Closet York Pinafore, I knew I wanted to make one for myself. One of my goals this year has been to use some of nicer fabrics in my fabric stash (the ones I have been saving and afraid to cut into) to sew garments. This is a very sheer, float-y rayon and I have wanted to sew something but hadn’t been able to decide which pattern to try.

This weekend the temperature in Connecticut finally dipped below 80 degrees and I decided to take the plunge.

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Helen’s version of this longer pinafore used a facing and spaghetti straps instead of bias binding. I originally thought I would do that too but the more I thought about it, the more I thought I could achieve a similar effect by tapering the straps. I ended up piecing the front strap because I decided on this approach after I cut everything out (I had originally thought I would do the spaghetti straps but then changed my mind) but I don’t think the piecing is noticeable and it actually enabled me to get more length out of the relatively small piece of fabric.

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I tapered the straps so that they would be 1.5 inches at the top of the shoulder and used a navy cotton lawn for my bias binding. I feel as though the lawn gives a bit of structure to the strap and is less slippery so that the straps don’t slide off my shoulders. It is total heresy, I know, but I didn’t stay-stitch or under-stitch when I sewed the bias binding. I generally don’t. I try to handle the neck and arm holes very little and I don’t pin the binding on, I just hold it gently in place and sew.  When I iron the folded binding before top-stitching it in place, I just iron the fold into the lawn, not the rayon. Then I fold by hand and use wonder clips to hold it in place before I sew the top seam. You can see pictures of how I do this in my Gemma Tank posts. I spent a lot of time sewing bias binding when I made many Gemmas two summers ago and this approach is pretty quick and gives me good results.

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All in all this was a very quick sew. I like how swishy it is (you can see it in action on my Instagram post) and I like it with my white double gauze Gemma

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and also with my chambray Gemma, and I actually have a navy lawn Gemma that is almost finished (the source of the scraps I used for the navy lawn bias binding) which I think will also work well.

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I may also make or buy an inexpensive navy slip dress to layer under the pinafore which I think would be a nice casual look. I like that this garment works with dressier sandals but also with flip flops, as all the best summer dresses do.

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I feel as though I achieved a similar feel to Helen’s floral longer York but preserved the nice armhole shape which is one of my favorite design elements (and good motivation to keep swimming those laps at the pool!)

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I cut the back piece a bit longer than the front, not on purpose-it just worked out that way- but I ended up leaving it a bit longer in back because I liked how it turned out.

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This is my fourth York Pinafore. I have three more cut out. What can I say? When I love a pattern, I love a pattern and this is such a good one. It is all I have been wearing this summer (with my many Gemma tanks). You can see some of the many outfits I have been able to make by searching the hashtag #wearyouryorkday.

Here is a version in Cloud 9 Linen-Cotton canvas print:

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And this incredibly versatile version in Essex Linen which I blogged here:

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It goes with everything I own, literally.

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And my original lightweight linen muslin which I love so much:

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If you haven’t tried this pattern yet, what are you waiting for? Go forth and sew a linen or cotton or rayon York! You won’t regret it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Gemma Tank, Helen's Closet Patterns, Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Helen’s Closet York Pinafore in Linen X 2

When I first spied a tester version of the Helen’s Closet York Pinafore during Me Made May before its official release, I knew it was going to be hugely popular. I guessed that this was Helen’s new pattern because I am a Patreon Supporter of the fantastic Love to Sew podcast hosted by Helen and Caroline and in one of the subscriber-only extra LTS podcasts, Helen mentioned that her to-be-launched new pattern was a modern take on a pinafore. Since I am from Connecticut, I didn’t know what she meant by pinafore-here in the US, we call this particular garment a jumper- but when the tester posted a picture during Me Made May and referred to the garment she was wearing as a pinafore, I knew it must be the pattern.

Since the pattern release, it has been popping up all over the place and for good reason. It is a cute modern design, a relatively easy sew and it is fun to customize. I was thrilled because now I have  a pattern to use to sew all the slightly heavier fabrics in my stash (I have a number of linen blends and heavier cottons I purchased for various reasons and have not yet used). And it only takes 2 yards of fabric. So the day it was launched, I purchased the pdf and printed it out.

I had some issues with my printer-it cut off parts of the pattern- but I connected the lines and it looked ok and I cut out the front and back from this linen and started playing with the fit. I cut my first version by cutting between the medium and large cutting lines which usually works for me. I basted the shoulder and side seams and then started trying on the jumper and playing around, taking it in a bit in here and there, sewing more rows of basting stitches, and pretty soon my seam allowances were all over the place but I liked the shape. I was actually afraid that if unpicked the basting seams to sew French seams or add pockets, I wouldn’t be able to replicate the shape, especially since the fabric I used was a lightweight, rumpled linen blend.  So, I sewed a line of stitching along the innermost line of basting stitches, trimmed off the rest of the wonky seam allowances and called it done.

Here are some pictures of the finished garment:

and as worn with my much loved Gemma Tank in white double gauze. It is a little wonky and sack-like but I love it.

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img_2143I had altered this Floral Voile Ruby Dress to make it into a blouse during Me Made May since I hadn’t worn it much in the year since I sewed it. I happened to have it in my sewing room and tried on the York over the blouse and realized it was a perfect match for the linen so I used the extra fabric to make bias binding and a hem binding since the length was a bit short  and I finished it in time to wear to my stepdaughters’ graduation.

Since I raced to finish this wearable muslin before going on vacation, I didn’t actually read the meticulous fitting instructions that Helen included in this pattern.

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After vacation, I printed out another set of pattern pieces and decided that this time I would read and follow the instructions. I was also excited for pockets!

Based on the instructions, my measurements put me in a size Large and given my 5’9” height, Helen’s directions suggest adding 1.5 inches to the pattern by adding 1/2 an inch in three separate places. But when I lined up the version I had already made, it was much smaller than the new pattern that I had printed out and pieced together and in particular, the straps were shorter in my first version and I was pretty happy with where the upper part of the skirt hit my torso on version one. I actually think with my long torso it is sometimes more flattering to have the waist of the garment hit a little higher than my natural waist. So despite the really wonderful, logical instructions, I did not add any length to the straps of the pattern and just cut the pattern out between the M and L lines except for the straps which I cut on the M line at the top and the L lines along the armholes to add a bit of width to the straps. Since the new printed pattern was so much longer than the version I had already sewn, I just cut along the L hem line and decided to sew it up and see what happened. As I did with version 1, I drew a new curve for the neckline about half-way between the two versions of the pattern.

I decided to go for broke and sew French seams even though they always take more than 5/8 inch when I sew them (I have a hard time enclosing all the fraying edges with the 1/4 and 3/8 seams used to create French seams as Helen instructs in the pattern. I ended up sewing a 3/8 seam with wrong sides together and then a 1/2 inch seam with right sides together since it seemed as though I would have lot of extra width. The finished version was longer than version one as planned but even with my 7/8 inch French seams, it was also more roomy. It did not completely make sense but I figured I must have made more adjustments than I realized with my first version- it was such a blur. I tried on version 2 and took pictures. I liked it but did not love it because the linen-cotton blend I used for version 2 was more stiff than the linen I used for version 1 and I felt that overall, the finished garment was less flattering. Here it is with another favorite Gemma tank. I used quilting cotton for the top-stitching to accent the design features and this version had pockets but I didn’t like it as much because it was bigger and didn’t drape as nicely and felt a bit more dowdy.

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I had even lined the pockets using beautiful fabric given to me by a friend (leftover from a Gemma tank that I sewed during Me Made May.)

img_2239I was a bit disappointed but I chalked it up to a learning experience and figured I would try washing it and see if the fabric would soften up a bit.

And YAY! it not only softened up but it shrunk as well and now I love it! Go figure! Here are more pictures with more Gemmas. It is just a bit shorter, just a bit more fitted and much drapier. It is like a whole new garment.

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img_2244So maybe the fabric I cut out hadn’t been pre-washed (although I am almost positive I had washed it before I put it away last year) or maybe this linen-cotton blend really shrinks a lot? Either way, I am thrilled because after taking the time to line the pockets

and sew French seams and do all the things,

I am really happy with it. Now the only challenge is to figure out what to do about version 3. I am thinking that I will need to make more adjustments to my paper pattern. Such is the life a sewist.

In any event, I plan to wear this all summer. It goes with everything in my closet, especially my huge collection of Gemma Tanks.

Several years back I made many versions of the Made By Rae Gemma tank and I plan to wear my York every week this summer with a different Gemma. I think I have enough that I can wear a different combination every week. Want to join me? I will post every Tuesday with the hashtag #wearyouryorkday I actually have a couple of Gemmas cut out that I have been wanting to finish and this is just the incentive I need.

Congratulations to Helen on such a wonderful new pattern. I made four versions of the her Blackwood Cardigan this May and have more planned. She is on a roll!

 

 

 

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Cleo Skirt, Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Made By Rae Cleo Summer Showcase: So Many Skirts

cleo summer showcase (ig)

I am thrilled to be part of the Made By Rae Cleo Summer Showcase and to be able to share the many skirts I have made with the Made By Rae Cleo pattern. The Cleo is like all of the MBR patterns: beautifully drafted to be flattering and comfortable with clear directions that are really well illustrated. Rae’s patterns really are wonderful and are the foundation of my handmade wardrobe.

This is my most recent Cleo skirt. It is made with a beautiful voile by Sharon Holland. I also made an Isla Knit Dress in the blue colorway of the same fabric. The design really spoke to me.Here it is worn with a black double gauze MBR Gemma Tank left untucked and blowing in the breeze:
and with the same Gemma Tank tucked in with clogs: and with a yellow lawn Gemma Tank:and with a black lawn Gemma Tank a different pair of sandals:and with my newly sewn Piper Top:It would also be great with my new black Rumi Tank top which you will see further down the post. 😊

My voile Cleo Skirt might just be my favorite but it is hard to choose because I have made so many others. The Cleo is also great in cotton lawn. Here are two versions I made with beautiful fabric from the Juniper collection by Kelly Ventura. Version 1:img_2644-1Version 2: img_2671-1I couldn’t decide which fabric to buy so I bought them both and I love both skirts. This fabric is lightweight and swishy. It was easy to sew with. It drapes beautifully. I am a total fan. img_0252-1They are both perfect with my blue cotton-linen Gemma and my newly sewn white double gauze Gemma and with any  number of colors of cardigans but I especially like this floral version with my orange cardigan. img_4925My yellow lawn Gemma Tank also works well with these skirts. img_6337I used scraps of the yellow for a facing for the hems for all three of my voile and lawn Cleos. The hem facing gives me a visual guide for where to fold the fabric and gives me more accurate results. I also just love the look of the contrasting hem.img_0214The Cleo is also great in lightweight woven fabrics. I made this version with a woven cotton-linen blend from Joanne Fabric. I also made a matching Gemma Tank which I love although I like them better worn separately.I used a white lightweight cotton batiste for the hem facing and bias binding.This skirt is perfect with my double gauze Gemma or with the yellow lawn Gemma. I ended up making this skirt about one inch shorter than the others because I ended up trimming some fabric from the skirt to line up the stripes.The Gemma top is perfect with just about anything but here it is with white jeans. Here they are together. Maybe a little too many stripes although I wore them with the top untucked once and liked them that way.I was inspired by Rae’s beautiful version to sew a Cleo in this great fabric from Anna Maria Horner’s Loominous II fabric line. It is so nice to wear. Really soft and lightweight. img_5226 I have really enjoyed wearing it this summer. It is perfect for hot summer days. This is a bit rumpled right out of the dryer and I don’t even care.img_5453-2I also sewed several versions of the Cleo in quilting cotton. I saw a beautiful Ruby dress on Instagram made with lime green fabric  by Heather Bailey and it inspired me to sew this Cleo. This fabric was a pleasure to sew with.  It is a bit poofier than the voile but I love the 50’s feel of this skirt.It is great with my new black knit Piper top.  One of the first Cleos I sewed was this one in April Rhodes’ Fringe fabric inspired by child and adult versions she made and posted on her Instagram. It is a nice lightweight quilting cotton that makes a great skirt. I love it with my blue, white and black Gemmas and it is perfect with boots and tights in winter.
I really love this fabric. It also makes a great pair of Luna Pants.I recently made the Rumi knit tank top by Christine Haynes and I love it with this skirt and flip flops for  summer. Front view: Back view: I enjoy experimenting with designs and patterns and I had this fabric in my stash. It is from the Arizona collection also from April Rhodes. I had fun sewing this skirt and seeing how this pattern looks with the gathers. This fabric is now available in a new colorway which would also be great.Again with the white double gauze Gemma. Such a perfect piece for mixing and matching.And here is my original tester Cleo. It fit really well without any real adjustments. I was so honored to be included as a tester for this pattern. It is absolutely amazing to me to have started sewing for myself two years ago and to now have an entirely Me Made wardrobe and to have had the opportunity to test a pattern for Made By Rae. Amazing!

I am 5’9 1/2″ tall and average build but most of my height is in my torso so I generally don’t need to add length to skirts. My measurements put me right between a Medium and a Large and I cut between those lines to make my tester version but as the skirt is pretty full, I have made the rest of them in a straight Medium and I am very happy with the fit.

When I made the test version, I loved the length as it was unhemmed and thought it was perfect for me. Rae ended up lengthening View B in the final version of the pattern but I keep sewing mine using my unhemmed tester pattern length. I started sewing hem facings because I didn’t want to have to figure out how much to add to end up with the same perfect length. So my skirts are all based on the skirt pattern piece unhemmed length of 23 inches less about 3/8 inch for the seam allowance for my hem facing.

I ended up giving my tester version to my beautiful daughter who had the perfect shoes to match. Here she is during a recent visit to Connecticut.And here she is in a Cleo action shot back in the Midwest. I have a navy cotton lawn version in the works for her in this great Ninepin lawn from Cotton and Steel. I may make version A which is a bit shorter and has great pockets,The Cleo would also be amazing in this double gauze and this rayon.  I think a longer rayon Cleo with boots would be perfect for fall. And the double gauze version Rae made is so beautiful it is tempting to make one just like it. You can see how one can easily be inspired to make So Many Skirts!

I have really loved sewing this pattern and highly recommend it.

Links to my other Cleo posts below and to all of the wonderful participants in the Cleo Showcase. Be sure to check them out and be inspired.

Nursebean Cleo Posts:

I have sewn many versions of most of the MBR patterns. You can link to some of them here:

Cleo Showcase Instagram and Blog Links:

july 31

vicky / @sewvee / sewvee.blogspot.co.uk

erin / @hungiegungie / hungiegungie.com

natalie / @sewhungryhippie / hungryhippie sews

teri / @teridodds1 / fa sew la

august 1

tori / @thedoingthingsblog / thedoingthingsblog.com

lindsay / @lindsayinstitches

meredith / @thefooshe / oliviajanehandcrafted.com/blog

kate / @kate.english

august 2

melissa / @ahappystitch / ahappystitch.com

julie / @nursebean82 / nursebeansews.wordpress.com

lauren / @laurenddesign / laurendurrdesign.com

august 3

fleurine / @mariefleurine / sewmariefleur.com

bettina / @stahlarbeit / stahlarbeit.ch

allie / @indie_sew / indiesew.com/blog

darci / @darcialexis / darcisews.com

emily / @mycraftylittleself / mycraftylittleself.blogspot.com

august 4

whitney / @whitneydeal / whitney-deal.com/blog

sienna  /@notaprimarycolor

amy nicole / @amynicolestudio / amynicolestudio.com

kim / @pitykitty

kten / @jinxandgunner / jinxandgunner.blogspot.com

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Cleo Skirt, Gemma Tank, Made By Rae Patterns, Pearl Shift, Sewing

Summer Sewing: June 2017

The view out of the window of my sewing room in the late afternoon. I am so lucky to have this little room of my own. Gemma Tank being finished below.June was a very busy month work-wise and I didn’t have as much time as I would like to sew but I had some projects that were almost done after Me Made May and so I used the time I could find to finish some Gemma Tanks and a Cleo Skirt. I am looking forward to mixing and matching these all summer.

I made a yellow lawn tank out of Robert Kaufman Cambridge Lawn in Maize. I made the scoop necked version in a Medium and lengthened it an inch or so. I applied the bias binding using the traditional method in which you see the binding because I didn’t want the shoulders to be too narrow.I originally planned to wear it with two Cleo skirts that I made in May with beautiful navy lawn fabric. but have found that it goes just as well or better with my striped cotton-linen blend skirt.I ended up having extra of the striped fabric and made another Gemma Tank. I love it. This fabric from Joanne’s was a great purchase. I know this will get a lot of wear year-round. It is perfect with white capris and jeans. 

I finished a Gemma Tank in April Rhodes fabric that I started last summer. I have already worn it several times. It is perfect with jeans and a mustard cardigan. Such a great print.I also finished another Gemma-Pearl Tunic. I absolutely love this shape. I will definitely be making more of these. This is in a beautiful tea-stained print by Cotton and Steel. I used scraps from a much loved Washi dress for the bias binding. I love how easy the Cotton and Steel fabric is to work with. You don’t even need pins. Seriously. Even bias binding is a pleasure with this fabric. I rest my case. This fabric makes me feel as though I can do no wrong. Not something I can say about all fabrics!
For a tutorial on how to make this tunic, check out this post. I finished a Cleo Skirt in a beautiful voile designed by Sharon Holland called Mudcloth. I can’t wait to wear this. I am finishing a black lawn Gemma Tank which I think will be perfect but the yellow works too. I am really happy with how versatile these tops and skirts are. I was wearing the first Cleo skirt that I made while I hand-sewed the front waistband.I love this Loominous Fabric by Anna Maria Horner. This has turned out to be a great hot weather outfit. The tank is one of the many Gemmas that I made last year.The blue and white striped tank and skirt are also great together. I didn’t plan them that way but when I had my pile of various projects on my ironing board I saw them together and realized that that would be another great outfit. I think I have reached the point where I have enough hand-sewn clothes to last for years to come. But fabric designers keep designing beautiful fabric so I will be continuing to sew. Next up is an Isla Dress using these beautiful new knits from April Rhodes. Who could resist?

 

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Bias Binding, Gemma Tank, Made By Rae Patterns, Pearl Shift, Sewing

Gemma meets Pearl

img_2673-1I had been wanting to try making a Gemma Tank lengthened to a tunic length since last summer when I made a lined voile dress version of the Gemma seen here. For the dress version, I followed Rae’s tutorial and made it with a curved hem. This May I decided to blend the Gemma with the Pearl Shift pattern which works for me in a tunic length so I literally taped the pattern pieces together. This is pretty much the most low-tech mash-up you will ever see but it worked really well and I love the finished garment. I used this great pink and navy bandana fabric from Cotton and Steel. I was inspired to buy this print when I saw a great sleeveless version of the Pearl Shift using this fabric made by Alexia Abegg (who designed both the pattern and the fabric) which is pretty close to what I have made here.

I cut a medium scooped neck Gemma and for the Pearl, I used my much used pattern pieces which I long-ago tapered from about the high waist down to the hem from the Small to the extra Small line on the front pattern piece and from the Medium to part way between the Medium and Small cutting lines for the back. I made these adjustments when I first made the Pearl pattern. I found that the pattern if made as directed was a bit big and the skirt sort of winged out to the sides a bit too much for me. It was sort of a triangular shape. I am bigger in the back than in the front so I tapered the front a lot and back a bit and these adjustments have given me a nice fit that I have used for all my Pearls after the first one.

I literally used one piece of tape to join the pattern pieces so that I could un-tape the pieces after cutting out the tunic. The back pieces seen below lined up perfectly. and the front. I lined the pieces up at the center fold and in the front, because the Pearl is wider, I folded down the top of the Pearl pattern and cut on the Gemma cutting lines to just below the bust dart line:I then took folded away the bottom of the Gemma and used the Pearl cutting lines as a guide, joining the two lines. I then moved away the pattern pieces and used my rotary cutter to make sure I had a nice smooth seam line. 

xxI was using 2 yard pieces of fabric so I basically lined things up to maximize the length and make two equally long pieces. It worked out to be just the right length. One thing I do every time I make a Gemma is to shift the pattern just a tiny bit when I cut the neck as a sort of hollow chest adjustment so it doesn’t gape. Also quite low tech. I shift the pattern piece back after cutting the neckline and cut the rest normally.Once cut out it was like sewing any Gemma. It all came together nicely. I stay-stitched around the neck and armholes. I  used some pink cotton lawn to bind the neck and armholes and for a hem facing.I used this method. And after a quick couple of hours, I was in business. This is the perfect after work attire. I love it with leggings, jeans or on its own for hanging around the house. Finished garment from the back on the front door place of honor.And as worn from the side.  It is just loose enough. Comfortable without gaping.From the back:And from the front as worn with jeans. Make this! You will be glad you did. 

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Made By Rae Patterns, Sewing

Ikat Luna Pants

Last year I made 2 versions of the Luna Pants, a Made By Rae pattern. I am going to be honest and say that at first, I couldn’t imagine that this style was for me. I just didn’t think that they would be flattering. But then I kept seeing great versions on Instagram and I had to try the pattern for myself. I made both of the first two pairs in Art Gallery quilting cotton which is softer and lighter than most. I wear them all the time and have found that they are incredibly comfortable, surprisingly flattering and especially great for traveling.  They are my go-to airline attire.

One of the challenges I starting during May is to make a new version of each of my favorite patterns using somewhat nicer fabric than quilting cotton. I made several Cleo skirts using a lovely cotton lawn and a Gemma tank out of double gauze (both blogged in the same post) and for this version of Luna Pants I found a lovely lightweight loosely woven cotton.  I bought it at fabric.com where it is currently on sale. It would also make a great Cleo skirt or Gemma tank but I restrained myself and didn’t buy more even though I was tempted.img_2639I wasn’t sure which direction the design was supposed to go but my husband felt that the design looked like arrows and should point up so that is what I did. I have to be careful with this type of pattern because it is so subtle that it is easy for me to forget and cut one of the pieces the wrong direction. I made a size that is halfway between a Medium and a Large based on my measurements around the hips and then graded back down to a medium at the ankle. I made them quick quick quick. I did not sew french seams although I probably should have but I decided to just sew my seams as I usually do and finish them with a zig zag stitch which is my fast and easy technique. If I ever make these in double gauze it will be french seams all the way. I did make the pockets which are really well drafted the way that they are sewn into the waistband. Love them!img_4202I cut this out and sewed it in an afternoon and I don’t really have pictures of the process but my other Luna posts give more details. It is a very straightforward pattern. I did add 2 inches to the length because I had written a note on the pattern to do this based on the last time I made them but I didn’t end up needing all the length and trimmed it back to almost the standard length. Although I am 5′ 9.5″,  most of my height is in my torso. I wear a 31 or 32 inseam.  There are many pictures below of the finished pants as worn with my newly sewn double gauze Gemma. I had actually thought that a slightly cropped Gemma with a straight hem in the higher neckline version would be a good look with the pants but I wanted to wear them the same day I made them and I actually think this is fine. Such a comfortable outfit. img_4273I tried them with a slightly higher heeled clog for a more dressy look.img_4295-1My husband got much better at taking pictures as the days of Me Made May went by.img_4251They are great with my trusty 20 year old jeans jacket.img_4316And as I will usually wear them with flip flops and a cardigan.img_4370One funny thing happened as a sewed. I didn’t realize that I left a pin in where I couldn’t see it and I sewed it right into the seam. I ended up having to cut the thread to free the pin and resew that section of the seam.img_4206I realized that I was using the previously sewn pin later that month when I pinned another project.img_4752I highly recommend this pattern. It is even more wonderful in this softer loose weave fabric. I will be wearing them all summer.img_4250Also highly recommended is Rae’s Luna Pants Sewalong. I have learned so much from her posts and tutorials. It is a great way to make the pattern, a bit at a time.

Happy sewing!

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